August 1, 2020

August Prayer Ventures

In 1 Peter 5:6-7 we read: “Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, so that he may exalt you in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him, because he cares for you.” The Apostle Peter assures us that God will hear our humble, honest, and trusting prayer, made in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. Thanks be to God!

 

PRAYER VENTURES:  August 2020

These petitions are offered as guides to prayer for the global, social and outreach ministries of the ELCA, as well as for the needs and circumstances of our neighbors, communities and world. Thank you for your continued prayers for the life and mission of this church.

1 Pray for open hearts and minds, that we might reflect prayerfully on our church, society, institutions, laws, traditions and selves, seeking meaningful change and reform to combat racism and white supremacy wherever they exist, perpetuate injustice or influence us.

2 Pray that the story of Jesus feeding the hungry crowd will inspire us to be compassionate and generous, and that, individually and together, we will be able and equipped to respond to the needs of our neighbor.

3 Give thanks for artists and craftspeople who share their creative gifts and perspectives, arousing our joy, wonder, reflection and appreciation of life.

4 Pray that we will not be too inhibited to wrestle with God and God’s Word, or to have candid conversations with God, and that the Spirit will deepen our trust in God’s love, concern, forgiveness and patience with us.

5 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Young Adults in Global Mission program will not be sending out volunteers this year. Give thanks for young adults who have volunteered for global service over the years, and pray that the Spirit will guide the Young Adults in Global Mission program as it prepares to continue its work and ministry alongside our global companions.

6 Ask the Spirit to help us be bold and articulate in sharing who God is, what God has done and what God is doing in the world for the sake of all people.

7 Pray for the leaders, voting members and others gathered for the Southeastern Iowa Synod Assembly and participating in online sessions, that the Spirit will strengthen, guide and encourage them in choosing leaders, proclaiming the gospel, growing the church, serving our neighbor and doing God’s work in an ever-changing world.

8 Pray for the Spirit to stir within us humility, wisdom, empathy and a commitment to dismantle the barriers between people who live in wealth and people who live in poverty. Pray that all will have sufficient resources for daily life and self-sufficiency but also will develop a deeper commitment to mutual care and will value one another and our interdependence.

9 Just as Jesus calmed and reassured his disciples in a boat crossing a stormy sea, we pray for protection, comfort and renewal of faith in these difficult, uncertain times and in future ordeals.

10 Give thanks to God for leaders — paid and volunteer — who serve in youth, young adult and family ministries in our congregations and synods. Pray for the ELCA Youth, Young Adult and Youth Gathering ministries and the ELCA Youth Ministry Network, that their collective work of supporting, equipping and nurturing faith and of connecting leaders and young people will yield abundant fruit.

11 Pray that we will listen carefully to God and be receptive to the ways God speaks to us each day, especially when we least expect it or are slow to recognize God’s voice amid the noise and competing voices in the world.

12 “How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” Ask God to help us proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ and salvation, that all who hear will believe, be saved and enjoy the blessings of being a sibling in Christ with believers throughout the world.

13 Give thanks for nurses, who care for our physical, emotional and spiritual needs in diverse settings, including hospitals, community clinics, congregations, schools, home care, the military, facilities for older adults, health education programs and global mission. Pray for the Evangelical Lutheran Parish Nurse Association and its work supporting, equipping and encouraging parish nurses across the country.

14 Pray that during this pandemic, which has stretched beyond our expectations and imagination, we will be renewed in our commitment to the patience, sacrifice and awareness of the example we set as we continue personal health measures for the sake of our health and the wellness of our neighbors, community and nation.

15 Pray for the leaders, voting members and others of the Eastern North Dakota Synod who are gathering for their digital assembly, that the Spirit will strengthen, guide and encourage them in choosing leaders, proclaiming the gospel, growing the church, serving our neighbor and doing God’s work in an ever-changing world.

16 Pray for forgiveness and God’s mercy when our actions, words, intentions or thoughts dishonor God’s ways and commandments. Ask for the Spirit to help us shine as bright witnesses to God’s unbound, unbiased love for humanity and to serve our neighbor without prejudice or reluctance.

17 Remember in prayer the people and communities of India and Bangladesh that were affected by Cyclone Amphan in May. Pray for the response of Lutheran World Service India Trust, supported by Lutheran Disaster Response, as it provides food to families in urban slums, tarps and temporary shelters, and assists families in obtaining aid for housing reconstruction. Pray for God’s presence, comfort, hope and healing throughout their recovery.

18 God asks us to do justice and do what is right. Pray that we will be faithful to God’s ways and commandments and to Jesus’ example of unrestrained love and compassion for people who are needy, suffering or oppressed.

19 Give thanks for nimble, creative teachers and school staff as they adapt to the changing dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic with concern for the safety, education and personal needs of students and their parents.

20 God is gracious and blesses us; God’s face shines on us. Join creation and every nation in praising God and singing for joy!

21 Who can argue with the psalmist who proclaims that it is good and pleasant when we live together in unity? Pray that, amid unrest, conflict and division, we will work for the unity that God desires for us, a unity rooted in love, respect, justice, diversity, reconciliation, mutual understanding and advocacy for neighbors in need.

22 Give thanks for how God sustains us and nurtures our hope through interactions with friends, family, siblings in Christ, strangers and communities of faith ― in person and by phone, text, email, online meetings, posted notes and cards, and acts of kindness.

23 How do you respond when someone asks you about your faith, your beliefs, the church or who Jesus is? Pray that the Spirit will inspire our boldness and clarity as we, respecting and welcoming people’s questions, talk about our faith, recognize and seek opportunities to bear witness to God’s presence and work in the world, and reveal the Jesus we know and follow through our actions and prayerful conversations.

24 Pray for students beginning a new academic year, that they will adjust quickly to new ways of learning, being together and interacting safely. Ask the Spirit to inspire our communities of faith to provide support, encouragement and help for children, youth, young adults and parents, especially during these beginning weeks and months of school.

25 “In one body we have many members, and not all the members have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually we are members one of another.” Give thanks and praise to God for the diverse gifts, skills and life experiences we have been given, which we share in the body of Christ to build each other up and do God’s work in the world.

26 Remember in prayer our global companions and all nations fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, the resulting economic problems and social and emotional stress, and the lack of accessible health care and adequate medical resources. Pray that we will respond to our global neighbors in need with empathy, hope and generosity, freely sharing our resources, discoveries and technology.

27 Give thanks and praise to God for hearing our words, loving us, sustaining us through times of trouble and strengthening our spirit and faith.

28 Give thanks that, as a church, we listen to the needs of our neighbors, roll up our sleeves and get to work with partners and companions in our communities and the world, helping and serving where the needs are greatest.

29 In this presidential campaign year, pray that our leaders and candidates will serve all people, especially those in the greatest need; work to heal wounds and divisions in society; strive for justice and equality; and seek change for the well-being and prosperity of our communities. Pray that our faith, wisdom and concern for neighbors and global companions will guide our discernment and decisions in upcoming elections.

30 Give thanks that we have been transformed and made new through God’s love for us and our baptism in Jesus Christ. Pray that the living word of Jesus will guide our baptismal journeys so that we extend hospitality to strangers, love and serve our neighbor, overcome evil with good, accompany people who are suffering and in pain, and disavow vengeance and hate.

31 Pray for synod leaders and committees as they carefully plan assemblies rescheduled for this fall or next year. Remember that our strength and unity in Christ transcend traditional places, methods or times of gathering — we are the church, the body of Christ, in every setting and circum


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Pentecoste Sunday was our first time for in-person worship. It went well. Some thirty-eight people were present. Everyone was agreeable in following the guidelines to sit only in designated places, to wear masks (except for worship leaders), to refrain from singing, receive communion in the pew, and social-distance upon arriving and finally leaving. There was a problem with the sound system, which we believe has been fixed. With the same procedures in place to keep us safe, we will continue corporate worship.

The service is live-streamed on YouTube, and available after worship time for you to see. Remember- it’s a blended service in the sanctuary at 10am. If you are at home, you may have elements of bread and wine in front of you, and feel that connection as we at Trinity’s altar receive the blessed sacrament.

 

As per the governor’s plan and guidelines for corporate worship published by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and its Delaware-Maryland Synod of which Trinity is a part, we will resume public worship on Sunday, May 31st.  As per the governor’s plan, attendance is limited to 50% of the available seating.  Since our nave seats several hundred, this should not be a problem (it would be nice if it were a problem!).  Since it is difficult to practice social distancing in Fellowship Hall, our services for the foreseeable future will be at 10AM (a compromise time, ala the Unity services) upstairs in the sanctuary.  We hope to have a blend of traditional and praise music at each or at alternating services.  Here is what to expect:

    1. You must practice social distancing at the entrance of the main door to the church.  You will be asked to remain at the end of the rail at the ramp door until the person in front of you has gone through the inner doors.  If standing facing the church, these are the doors to the far left.  DO NOT CONGREGATE IN THE NARTHEX OR OUTSIDE THE DOORS OF THE CHURCH!
    2. One usher in protective gear will be at the door to give you a bulletin and a communion kit (described below).  The production of the bulletins will be done in such a way as to minimize physical contact with them.  The person reproducing them will wear gloves&d place the bulletins in a box for the usher to hand to you.
    3. When you enter the church, you will you see tape roping off some pews, and tape marking off some areas of each pew, so as to allow separated seating for you and your family in others. so we can all keep at least 6’ feet apart.  This is strongly worded in the governor’s directive.
    4. You must always wear a mask.  The only exceptions will be the worship leaders who will remain in the chancel, and separated from each other and from you by larger distances.
    5. There will be no offering by way of the passed plate.  There will be a box at the doorway for you to place your offering on the way out.  Please be careful not to touch envelopes or cash which might already be in the box.
    6. We will attempt to leave by rows, again to practice social distancing.  Wait for an usher to direct you out.  DO NOT CONGREGATE IN THE NARTHEX OR OUTSIDE THE DOORS OF THE CHURCH!
    7. We will have communion, but it will be taken in your pew by way of an individual serving.  The elements will be in a container much resembling the liquid creamer we put in our coffee.  Upon tearing off the first seal you will find a wafer.  Upon removing the second seal you will find grape juice. You will be directed by the pastor when to consume the elements.  Wine is preferred to grape juice, but is not available in these cups, since they are generally used in congregations which use only grape juice.  Please dispose of your kit by putting it in a box at the door. I understand the communion cups are difficult to open so you might want to bring napkins in case of spillage!  If you have concerns about opening the wine portion, opening and consuming only the wafer is fine.
    8. Only the bathroom by Memorial Hall will be available for your use.  This is to minimize cleaning.
    9. The service will be around 45 minutes, since it is difficult to wear a mask for a longer period.
    10. Please take your temperature at home before coming out.  If you have a temperature, obviously you should remain there, and watch the service from home.

Some people will still be reluctant to come to public worship, so the service will be live streamed.

Under no circumstances should you feel
compelled to attend the service
.

We all must make individual decisions about potential exposure to the virus.  If you do not come, please be part of the service by watching on our live stream.  Your financial support of Trinity has been very encouraging, and we hope it will continue as the situation unfolds.

A further note—since it is difficult to practice social distancing in the office area, restrictions as to who may enter there will remain in place.  We do not want the staff to be infected.  Signs at the Randolph entrance will tell you how to interact with the staff.

Pastors David and Greg have not been making visits.  Fortunately, no one has been hospitalized lately.  Walter Bell died during the lock-down.  However, his family attended to his burial and Trinity did not play a part.  Rules are especially stringent at viewings and services at the funeral home.  Our pastors will not make visits to homes until it is safe to do so.  Hospital visits will be on a case-to-case basis.  It may be possible to arrange a Zoom meeting.  Funerals will have to follow guidelines established by the funeral directors, except at church- where our own guidelines will be in effect.

We are so happy that our community of faith will once again be able to meet in our beautiful sanctuary.  Please, please, please observe the guidelines above so we can all be safe!  We pray that the rate of infection for COVID-19 will continue to decrease and that our regular opportunities for social interaction will return.

If you have any questions about what is contained in this article, please call the church office at 301-733-2878 or email us at office@tlchag.org.  If you have other suggestions as to how we can be safe in worship, please feel free to share them.

 

Trinity Sunday

I told you we would be using the Athanasian Creed on Sunday, The Holy Trinity. Celebrated on the Sunday after Pentecost, inthis namesake feast of our congregation, we recall that God is for us Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. I asked you to look at the creed and promised part 2 about the Trinity today. Here it is!

image.pngOne of the courses I had in seminary eons ago was simply called “The Holy Trinity.” It was taught by a brilliant but somewhat eccentric professor, Robert Jenson. Dr. Jenson had an illustrious career, teaching at several seminaries and universities. He was the author of many seminal books and articles. He died in 2017 at the ripe age of eighty-seven.

I remember the course with some chagrin, because I nearly failed it. Back then, grades at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg (now United Lutheran Seminary) were pass/fail. Failure was below 70%. I eked my way through it with a 71. I would like to say that, after taking the course, I came through it with a clear understand of the Holy Trinity. Unfortunately, that is not true. I struggle each year on the Feast of the Holy Trinity (the Sunday after Pentecost) to preach a sermon which helps my listeners understand the Godhead we know as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This year I pawned it off on Alex Knepper, a first year student at United Lutheran Seminary. Count your blessings, deacons Inga and Peggy, for if Alex wasn’t available, it would have been one of you!

My best explanation of the Trinity is that God reveals himself (the pronoun itself is a difficulty) as the Father who creates the Son who redeems, and the Spirit which sanctifies. I have to admit that makes sense but it is a heresy called Modalism. I’m not exactly sure why it’s a heresy, but take my word for it, Dr. Jenson called a number of us in the class out on this point.

image.pngThere are three Monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Monotheistic means “one God.” All three rejected other world religious views (i.e. near-Eastern polytheism, Buddhism and Hinduism) to embrace one, single God. For Jews and Muslims, this understanding is quite clear. There is one God. Some people mistakenly ascribe to the Prophet Mohammad in Islam same status just short of divinity. That’s patently wrong. Mohammad is God’s prophet, important as he may be for the tradition. But Christianity is left with an uneasy understanding of Jesus as God’s Son.

Over and over again, Jesus proclaims himself as God’s Son. His meaning is quite clear. He is part of God, and while inhabiting a human body, he is more than human, more than a prophet or a teacher. He is the Redeemer, the long-expected Messiah. Of course, Jews could not accept this. The idea itself was reprehensible. It was blaspheme, a crime punishable by death. That was the charge which got Jesus into such trouble. Jews would look at Christians and say they were no longer monotheists because they had TWO gods, not the one revealed in Hebrew scripture.

Then add in the Spirit, which comes on Pentecost to the disciples and that band of followers who believed Jesus was the Messiah. Being described under many names—the Comforter, the Paraclete, the Holy Ghost—it seems that there is now another God. Jews would reject this notion out-of-hand.

When Mohammad received his call in the late 500s to be a prophet of God and begin a religious tradition we know as Islam, like Jews, he looked at Christianity and wondered how it could proclaim a unified God with three different persons as theology, by then well defined. He could accept Jesus as a prophet, but not equal to God. For Islam, there is but one God. That’s the cry you hear coming from minarets at prayer time in Islamic countries.

image.pngNeedless to say, the theology which supported this understanding of a three-part-Godhead (ugg, I’m back in Modalism) was fought out with incredible acrimony in the Church. Many heresies, especially about the nature of Jesus as part of the Trinity, came and went. People were persecuted and excommunicated because they espoused wrong views. I’m glad burning at the stake for heretics was not in vogue in the 1970s, when I nearly flunked the course on the Trinity at Gettysburg Seminary!

In the end, we can only understand God so far as God has revealed herself to us. We get a small peek at the vastness of God when we see the Trinity at work (I’m headed to Modalism again). The great mystery of God is that this divine thing chooses to be involved with us. The fullness of that divinity cannot be understood by us in the here and now.

The creed which bears the name of that great defender of orthodoxy in the Catholic Church, St. Athanasius, makes clear the unity of the Trinity. Where the creed comes from is a mystery itself. Some think it was a teaching lesson for Spanish priests. Its length and condemnatory language make it daunting for us to use but once a year on the only day of the year we celebrate a doctrine, rather than an event or a person. I think it’s important for us to use, since it is one of the three ecumenical creeds. Its very length and the strength of its language do make clear how important it is that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit be part of our belief in a God who is at the same time mysterious and available.

Give it a go, Alex!
– Pastor David

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